Commercial Property Guide - 2018

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At SAS Daniels we're involved in multiple commercial property deals across the North West and surrounding areas, and have expert knowledge of the local scene. Click on your chosen location for the latest news and upcoming developments.

Commercial Property Guide - 2018

Shrewsbury

  • Area population

    71,715
  • Average commercial property cost

    £294,389 (based on individual property units under £1 million)
  • Average rental yield

    6.99%

Commercial Property Guide - 2018

Macclesfield

  • Area population

    52,044
  • Average commercial property cost

    £288,316 (based on individual property units under £1 million)
  • Average rental yield

    7.01%

Commercial Property Guide - 2018

Chester

  • Area population

    118,200
  • Average commercial property cost

    £358,125 (based on individual property units under £1 million)
  • Average rental yield

    8%

Commercial Property Guide - 2018

Congleton

  • Area population

    26,493
  • Average commercial property cost

    £254,493 (based on individual property units under £1 million)
  • Average rental yield

    7.3%

Commercial Property Guide - 2018

Stockport

  • Area population

    284,500
  • Average commercial property cost

    £309,365 (based on individual property units under £1 million)
  • Average rental yield

    8.27%

Commercial Property Guide - 2018

Warrington

  • Area population

    202,200
  • Average commercial property cost

    £360,225 (based on individual property units under £1 million)
  • Average rental yield

    9.54%

Commercial Property Guide - 2018

Newcastle-under-Lyme

  • Area population

    123,871
  • Average commercial property cost

    £280,498 (based on individual property units under £1 million)
  • Average rental yield

    7.61%

Commercial Property Guide - 2018

Middlewich

  • Area population

    13,565
  • Average commercial property cost

    £250,000 (based on individual property units under £1 million)
  • Average rental yield

    6.29%

Commercial Property Guide - 2018

Crewe

  • Area population

    84,863
  • Average commercial property cost

    £159,838 (based on individual property units under £1 million)
  • Average rental yield

    9.35%

Commercial Property Guide - 2018

Wrexham

  • Area population

    135,000
  • Average commercial property cost

    £229,781 (based on individual property units under £1 million)
  • Average rental yield

    8.33%
Nicknamed Silktown and famed for its monthly Treacle Market, Macclesfield has an enviable position - Peak District hills rise up to the east and the Cheshire Plain extends out to the west.

History

In the nineteenth century it was a world centre for finished silk production, with 71 mills operating at the industry's peak.

Today

Modern Macclesfield is a relatively prosperous town with an attractive centre around the Georgian Town Hall, 13th century St Michael and All Angels church and the cobbled Marketplace. Industrially it's a manufacturing centre for Astra Zeneca with lots of light industry and the landmark Arighi Bianchi furniture store opposite the train station.

  • Easy reach of Stockport, Manchester, Congleton, Stoke-on-Trent and Buxton.
  • 30 minute journey to Manchester and less than two hours to London.
  • Manchester Airport is a 28 minute drive away and easy to reach by train.

Transport

With easy access from north, south and west via the A6, A523, A537 and A536, Macclesfield is within easy reach of Stockport, Manchester, Congleton, Stoke-on-Trent and Buxton. Manchester Airport is a 28 minute drive away and easy to reach by train. From Macclesfield station it's a 30 minute journey to Manchester and less than two hours to London.

Forthcoming developments are:
  • Grosvenor Centre

    The existing Grosvenor Centre is about to have over 50,000 sq ft of space added.

  • Barracks Mill

    £13m retail park on a derelict six acre site with 'bulky goods' units.

What the experts say

A huge enhancement of Macclesfield's retail capacity is on the way. The existing Grosvenor Centre is about to have over 50,000 sq ft of space added and whilst the traditional British high street is in decline in many towns, Macclesfield’s high street has retained a raft of high quality independent shops. Many are hopeful that the prospect of high-speed rail services and this retail development will boost the local economy and encourage investment in the area.

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The Roman city, previously known as Deva, was founded in 79 AD. It nestles on the Welsh border and the Dee estuary and is famous for its medieval cathedral, superbly preserved walls and many ancient buildings.

History

Beginning as a Roman army base under the Emperor Vespasian, Chester became the capital of North West England in the Middle Ages and beyond.

Today

Chester has the most complete Roman walls, the oldest racecourse and the largest Roman amphitheatre in Britain. It's a major shopping and tourist destination, based around the half-timbered galleries of The Rows. Tourism and other service industries are the major employers, along with the financial services sector.

  • Chester is a motorway hub.
  • There are trains to London, Liverpool, Manchester and more.
  • Hawarden Airport is an 18 minute drive away.

Transport

Chester is a motorway hub, with the M53 towards the Wirral and Liverpool and the M56 to Manchester. There's also the A55 along the North Wales coast to Holyhead, and the A483 to Wrexham, then across Wales to Swansea. Trains run from Chester station to London, Liverpool, Manchester, Crewe, Cardiff, Leeds and Birmingham.

Forthcoming developments are:
  • Chester Northgate

    This is a planned £300 million shopping, leisure and residential development to transform the north west quarter of the city centre. With a multi-screen cinema, new market hall, shops, restaurants and hotel it's expected to create 2,800 jobs.

What the experts say

Chester is thriving as a business centre, as a place people want to live and as a tourist attraction. Housebuilders continue to provide new homes in and around the city, and there is continuing demand for options and promotion agreements. In tourism terms, Chester's growth is getting stronger and stronger. In 2016 Cheshire West attracted 35 million visitors and footfall in the city rose by 11.7%, far outstripping the national average. As well as the beautiful and historic city itself, nearby attractions include Chester Zoo, Cheshire Oaks for shopping and the Anderton Boat Lift. The next stage for Chester is to become more of an overnight destination, rather than just a place for day trips. The signs are promising, with a recent 6.1% growth in hotel stays.

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With its famously debatable pronunciation and strategic position on the River Severn, just nine miles from the Welsh border, Shrewsbury is a historic crossroads, market town and trading centre.

History

An important centre of the wool trade in the Middle Ages, and subject to occasional attempts at invasion from Wales, Shrewsbury is also famous as the birthplace of Charles Darwin.

Today

Modern Shrewsbury is the commercial centre of Shropshire and mid-Wales, with plenty of light industry and distribution centres. It still has the original medieval street plan and many ancient listed buildings give it a unique character.

  • The A5 connects the town to the motorway network via the M54 at Telford.
  • Trains run to Wales, Manchester, and Birmingham.

Transport

Shrewsbury train station is known as the gateway to Wales, and services run to Manchester and Birmingham as well as Cardiff and Aberystwyth. The A5 connects the town to the motorway network via the M54 at Telford.

Forthcoming developments are:
  • Riverside Scheme

    The £150m Riverside Scheme is a key forthcoming commercial development and will link the town's three shopping centres.

What the experts say

Two successful retail centres are already in place in Shrewsbury, with a new Lidl on its way to the Meole Brace centre, whilst it’s believed Shropshire Council will propose to redevelop/modernise the under-occupied Riverside shopping centre. The planned Northern relief road will link large industrial parks in the north of the town to the A5 bypass, effectively creating a ring road to the north and west of the town, which will open up residential and employment opportunities. Excitingly, the University of Chester has secured £2 million in funding to develop courses on environmental science and sustainable energy in the Shrewsbury area, which is a hotbed of AD and renewable energy facilities. Another potential development is a new hospital between Shrewsbury and Telford, if the NHS Trust decides to consolidate the existing hospitals on one site.

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Nicknamed Beartown, because of its relationship with the animal since the 17th century, Congleton is a market town on the Cheshire Plain and the River Dane.

History

Like nearby Macclesfield, Congleton manufactured silk, as well as leather gloves, lace and cotton. Many of the mills survive as industrial or residential units.

Today

Largely a home for commuters to Manchester and Stoke, with plenty of light manufacturing industry. National Trust Tudor house Little Moreton Hall is a local landmark. Quick access to the Cheshire countryside is one of the town's major assets.

  • The M6 is just seven miles away. Excellent road links to Buxton, Macclesfield and Leek.
  • Trains run to Manchester and London via Stoke.

Transport

The train station is on the Manchester to Stoke route with trains to London via Stoke. The M6 is just seven miles away and Congleton is on the A34 trunk road from Stoke to Manchester. Excellent road links to nearby Buxton, Macclesfield and Leek.

Forthcoming developments are:
  • Congleton Leisure Centre

    An £8m redevelopment of Congleton Leisure Centre is planned, funded by Cheshire East Council, incorporating a new swimming pool, fitness and gym facilities, refurbished main buildings and community spaces.

What the experts say

For a relatively small town, Congleton has a lot of business parks. There's excellent access to the nearby M6 and the planned relief road is likely to make the town an even more attractive spot for commercial development. There are also a number of residential developments in the pipeline, providing a ready workforce for new businesses.

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A world hat making centre in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Stockport is a large market town, famous for its massive railway viaduct over the River Mersey.

History

Stockport was transformed from a small market town to one of the earliest cotton manufacturing centres in the 18th century Industrial Revolution.

Today

Modern Stockport has a varied industrial base, and the town incorporates a number of prosperous suburbs including Bramhall, Marple, Hazel Grove, Cheadle Hulme and Heaton Moor.

  • The M60 Manchester Orbital Motorway and the A6 cross at Stockport.
  • Trains run from Manchester to London every 20 minutes. There are frequent services to Birmingham, Liverpool, and other major cities.
  • Manchester Airport is a 15 minute drive away.

Transport

The M60 Manchester Orbital Motorway and the A6 cross at Stockport. Rail services from Manchester (only 10 minutes away) to London stop at Stockport every 20 minutes, and services are frequent to Birmingham, Liverpool, Bristol, Sheffield and other major cities. Manchester Airport is five miles away from the town centre, with speedy access by motorway.

Forthcoming developments are:
  • Stockport Exchange

    Expected to create 350 jobs, Stockport Exchange is a planned £145m business district being developed by the Council and Muse Developments. Incorporating Grade A offices, hotel, leisure facilities and a new public square, it is located alongside Stockport station to make the most of its superb links to Manchester, London and other major centres.

What the experts say

Stockport Council is keen to promote and improve Stockport and has been the catalyst for a number of new projects - Stockport Exchange and the S:Park development to name but two. Regeneration is the key and the Council have a clear strategic approach to achieve this. There are more sites ripe for both residential and commercial development around the town making Stockport a much livelier place to live and work. Add to that its excellent transport links, including a new transport interchange with capacity to link into the Metrolink Tram network Stockport is attractive to incoming businesses.

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Named after a new castle in the Forest of Lyme, which covered parts of Cheshire, Staffordshire and Derbyshire. Newcastle-under-Lyme residents refused to join in the amalgamation of small towns to form Stoke-on-Trent in 1910.

History

The town's early economy was based on silk, cotton and hat making. Then coal mining, brickmaking and engineering took over.

Today

Keele University is nearby and the main industries now are iron working, building materials, clothing, computers and machinery.

  • The M6 is nearby and the A34 runs through Newcastle.
  • Trains run to Manchester, Birmingham and London.
  • Roughly equidistant between Manchester and Birmingham airports.

Transport

The M6 is nearby and the A34 runs through Newcastle. The town is served by nearby Stoke rail station (2.1 miles away from the town centre) with services to Manchester, Birmingham and London. It is roughly equidistant between Manchester and Birmingham airports.

Forthcoming developments are:
  • Ryecroft Scheme

    The planned £32m Ryecroft Scheme, with shops and student accommodation, will deliver 500 jobs to Newcastle. It is a joint venture between Henry Davidson Developments and regeneration specialists U+I.

What the experts say

With broad pedestrianised streets, six market days a week and award-winning floral displays, Newcastle-under-Lyme is a welcoming home for businesses. They can choose from a wealth of retail and business premises – often on easy terms and short trial leases. They'll be in good company too, because the centre boasts a fine selection of high street names and funky independents, plus cafés, bars, live music venues and a Vue cinema, along with a variety of offices and professional service companies. There's lots of business to be picked up from the town's college and Keele University, with 9,000 and 10,000 students respectively, as well as the University Hospital's 7,000 staff.

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The largest town in Cheshire, having doubled in population since 1968, Warrington is exactly half way between Liverpool and Manchester. In the Industrial Revolution it specialised in steel wire manufacture and the town's Rugby League club is still known to fans as The Wire.

History

First established as a crossing point on the Mersey, Warrington was a focal point and battleground in the English Civil War. Burtonwood was the largest US airbase outside America in the Second World War. Its modern growth followed the creation of Warrington New Town in 1968.

Today

IKEA's first UK store was here. The town now specialises in light industry, distribution and technology and has one of the North West's biggest shopping centres.

  • Proximity to the M6, M62 and M56.
  • Two train stations. Services to London and Glasgow.
  • Roughly equidistant between Manchester and Liverpool airports.

Transport

With two railway stations, regular services to London and Glasgow and proximity to the M6, M62 and M56, Warrington is very well connected. It is also midway between Manchester and Liverpool airports.

Forthcoming developments are:
  • Cheshire and Warrington Growth Hub

    The Cheshire and Warrington Growth Hub is now launching the second round of its SME growth grants: a programme to help small to midsize businesses to release their growth potential, with grants available between £1,000 and £18,000.

What the experts say

Cheshire's largest town, halfway between Liverpool and Manchester, Warrington is already well developed industrially. Despite its proximity to the major retail centres of Manchester, the Trafford Centre, Chester and Liverpool, Warrington has one of the largest shopping centres in the North West. It continues to attract customers thanks to its modern, well-appointed town centre.

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Middlewich, which was a centre of salt production under the Romans, is mentioned in the Domesday Book (1086) and was the site of two Civil War battles in 1643.

History

Industrially, chemical production grew alongside the salt industry and the town is served by the Shropshire Union, Trent & Mersey and Wardle canals.

Today

Despite the decline in the manufacturing industry, the town's population has doubled since 1970, with several housing developments.

  • Easy access to the M6 and the A533, A54 and A530.
  • Trains run to Crewe, Birmingham and Liverpool.
  • Close to both Manchester and Liverpool airports.

Transport

Middlewich is well connected, with easy access to the M6 and the A533, A54 and A530 passing through. Winsford railway station is only 2.3 miles from the town centre with trains running to Crewe, Birmingham and Liverpool. Manchester and Liverpool airports are respectively 22 and 30 miles away.

Forthcoming developments are:
  • Commercial and industrial development

    Plans are in place for a £4.1m 245,000 sq ft commercial and industrial development in Middlewich, with two units for general industrial, storage or distribution at first and outline permission for six more.

  • Bypass scheme

    There are also plans for a bypass scheme, which could ease town centre congestion and boost the local economy in terms of 28,000 jobs and 10,000 homes.

  • Fountain Fields Urban Park

    Finally, quality of life is about to be enhanced by a £300,000 urban park, with play space, green space and an adult gym at Fountain Fields in the town centre.

What the experts say

The headline story for commercial development is the proposed Middlewich bypass, which is already attracting new industrial and office businesses into the town. The prospects for growth and job creation are looking better and better.

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Synonymous with railways, Crewe is a mid-sized south Cheshire town which barely existed until the famous railway junction came along.

History

Monks Coppenhall became Crewe when the railway junction opened in 1837. The name means weir or crossing in Old Welsh. The population rapidly rose to 40,000 by 1871.

Today

Crewe Works, is still a major train maintenance and inspection centre, but much less important than it once was. The former Rolls Royce factory now specialises in Bentley cars and the town has a number of business parks with offices and light industrial units. Crewe will also be home to a major HS2 hub, the high speed rail network being designed to further connect UK cities.

  • Less than five miles from the M6.
  • One of the largest and best connected stations in the North West.
  • Manchester and Liverpool airports are both around an hour away.

Transport

Crewe station remains one of the largest and best connected in the North West, with 12 platforms and frequent trains to all the main cities to the north and south. It is less than five miles from the M6. Manchester and Liverpool airports are both around an hour away.

Forthcoming developments are:
  • Royal Arcade & Market Hall

    The £48m Royal Arcade and Market Hall development is expected to be completed by 2020, bringing a new cinema, gym, restaurants and shops to Crewe. It is funded and owned by Cheshire East Council, with a further £24m of private investment to be drawn in for the commercial aspects of the project.

What the experts say

Crewe is justly famous for its rail links and proximity to the motorway network via the M6. The expected arrival of HS2 will further enhance this and it is being widely seen as a future growth area, attracting investors and businesses from both the north and the south. Expect real growth in assets and income values.

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The largest town in North Wales and fifth largest in the principality, Wrexham is the region's educational, commercial and shopping hub. It is an ambitious town that has applied three times for city status.

History

Wrexham grew as a crossroads for traffic and commerce between England and Wales, with a superb position close to the border and on a plateau between the Dee Valley and Welsh mountains. Local reserves of iron ore and coal caused it to grow as an industrial hub.

Today

Wrexham has successfully switched from heavy industry to high tech manufacturing, and brewing remains a key industry. In 2007 it was rated fifth in the UK for start-up business success. JCB is a major employer in the area.

  • The Ring Road connects Wrexham to the A55(M53) and A5(M54).
  • It has four train stations.
  • Hawarden Airport is just 23 minutes drive away.

Transport

Hawarden Airport is just 15.1 miles away (a 23 minute journey on average). It is well served by trains with four stations. The Ring Road connects Wrexham to the A55(M53) and A5(M54).

Forthcoming developments are:
  • Local Development Plan

    There's a local development plan in place, which aims to deliver 8,000 new homes and 4,000 new jobs. There are also plans for a mixed-use residential and retail development at the Hippodrome.

What the experts say

Locally the main economic drivers are the University, the Hospital and the Wrexham Industrial Estate, north of the centre, which has been chosen as the site of a new prison, HMP Berwyn, and the new Village Bakery factory. A highly promising development is the recent creation of the Wrexham Business hub, established jointly by the local council and the Welsh Government. This has already attracted £1 million worth of private investment.

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